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  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 06/28/2022 at 2:00 PM (EDT)

    This session will discuss the 10-year evolution of the microblogging discussion processes, integration with cases, grading of student participation and different student behaviors seen from the analytics.

    In the Accreditation Standards For Dental Education Programs, the Commission on Dental Accreditation requires self-directed learning as part of the curricular instruction. “Educational programs must depart from teacher-centered and discipline-focused pedagogy to enable and support the students’ evolution as independent learners actively engaged in their curricula….” 

    Since the early 2000s, microblog/blog technologies have been used within the classroom to increase the scale and integration of problem-based learning (PBL) and case-based learning (CBL). In 2008, Todd Watkins, D.D.S., created a technology for grading participation in these discussions at East Carolina University School of Dental Medicine—thus, increasing the use of the technique. This session will discuss the 10-year evolution of the microblogging discussion processes, integration with cases, grading of student participation and different student behaviors seen from the analytics.

    Learning Objectives: 

    1. Review the basics of CBL and PBL and how microblog presentations to facilitated small groups may assist with these teaching techniques.
    2. Discuss the philosophy and processes for screening and grading microblog threads and posts.
    3. Explore the meaning of the analytics that are synthesized from the microblog grading process.
    4. Discuss what it means to be a PBL “Instigator,” “Filler,” “Cheerleader” and “Lurker,” and how to use these characterizations to enhance participation in student-directed learning

    Original Release Date: June 28, 2022

    Expiration Date: June 28, 2025

    Questions? Contact learn@adea.org

    CE Information:

    The American Dental Education Association is an ADA CERP Recognized Provider.

    An evaluation form is available to participants after the conclusion of the webinar. To earn continuing education (CE) credit for participation in the webinar, the online evaluation must be completed in full by June 28, 2025. After completing the evaluation, webinar participants can print and save the CE Verification Form.

    ADA CERP is a service of the American Dental Association to assist dental professionals in identifying quality providers of continuing dental education. ADA CERP does not approve or endorse individual courses or instructors, nor does it imply acceptance of credit hours by boards of dentistry.

    The American Dental Education Association designates this activity for 1.0 continuing education credit.

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    All speakers agree that neither they nor members of their immediate family have any financial relationships with commercial entities that may be relevant to their presentation.

    Todd Watkins, D.D.S.

    Assistant Dean for Dental Education and Informatics

    East Carolina University School of Dental Medicine

    Speaker agrees that neither they nor members of their immediate family have any financial relationships with commercial entities that may be relevant to their presentation.

    Maggie Pafford, D.M.D.

    Clinical Assistant Professor

    East Carolina University School of Dental Medicine

    Speaker agrees that neither they nor members of their immediate family have any financial relationships with commercial entities that may be relevant to their presentation.

    Mark Clinkscales, M.A.

    Discussion Platforms Specialist

    East Carolina University School of Dental Medicine

    Speaker agrees that neither they nor members of their immediate family have any financial relationships with commercial entities that may be relevant to their presentation.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 06/09/2022 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    In this complimentary webinar, two speakers will discuss strategies and course design of their individual courses that use a hybrid course format. They will discuss ways to follow a more “learner-centric” model, which will help to cultivate equity and inclusiveness in the Generation Z classroom.

    Generation Z, a cohort after the millennials, has grown up with unparalleled technological influences like smartphones and social media. Traditional teaching tools, such as classroom lectures and textbooks, do not as readily appeal to them. As we “rise from the COVID-19 pandemic” towards the future, we need to foster new ways to teach a new cohort of students entering dental schools. In this complimentary webinar, two speakers will discuss strategies and course design of their individual courses that use a hybrid course format. They will discuss ways to follow a more “learner-centric” model, which will help to cultivate equity and inclusiveness in the Generation Z classroom. 

    Note: A version of this program was presented at the 2022 ADEA Annual Session & Exhibition in Philadelphia, PA. 

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Identify modern tools to enhance the education of students in both didactic and clinical settings in the post-COVID era.
    2. Outline the various successes and failures in designing coursework to teach the Generation Z students.
    3. Discuss the use of several techniques to make the learning environment inclusive, equitable and focused on the Generation Z learner. 
    4. Identify modern tools to enhance the education of students in both didactic and clinical settings in the post-COVID era. 

    Original Release Date: June 9, 2022

    Expiration Date: June 9, 2025

    Questions? Contact learn@adea.org

    CE Information:

    The American Dental Education Association is an ADA CERP Recognized Provider.

    An evaluation form is available to participants after the conclusion of the webinar. To earn continuing education (CE) credit for participation in the webinar, the online evaluation must be completed in full by June 9, 2025. After completing the evaluation, webinar participants can print and save the CE Verification Form.

    ADA CERP is a service of the American Dental Association to assist dental professionals in identifying quality providers of continuing dental education. ADA CERP does not approve or endorse individual courses or instructors, nor does it imply acceptance of credit hours by boards of dentistry.

    The American Dental Education Association designates this activity for 1.0 continuing education credit.

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    All speakers agree that neither they nor members of their immediate family have any financial relationships with commercial entities that may be relevant to their presentation.

    Shravan Renapurkar, B.D.S., D.M.D., FACS

    Assistant Professor

    Virginia Commonwealth University School of Dentistry

    Dr. Renapurkar is an Assistant Professor and Director of the residency program in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (OMFS) at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Dentistry (VCU SOD). He is an alumnus and a graduate from the residency program in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at University of Minnesota School of Dentistry. Post-residency, he pursued a fellowship in Pediatric Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at Massachusetts General Hospital prior to joining VCU SOD as full-time faculty. 

    Dr. Renapurkar received a Doctor in Dental Medicine (D.M.D) degree at Boston University Henry M. Golden School of Dental Medicine, and a Bachelor of Dental Surgery degree at Government Dental College and Hospital, Hyderabad, India. He has published several peer-reviewed articles and book chapters and lectured at local study clubs, state and national professional meetings.

    He is a Diplomate of the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and a fellow of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS), the American College of Surgeons and the American Society of Temporomandibular Joint Surgeons. He is the Immediate Past-President of the Virginia Society of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, member of the AAOMS Committee on Research Planning and Technology Assessment and Junior Examiner in the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. He is involved with undergraduate and graduate OMFS education and has been an active speaker for VCU SOD continuing education courses.  

    Speaker agrees that neither they nor members of their immediate family have any financial relationships with commercial entities that may be relevant to their presentation.

    Sonali Rathore, B.D.S., M.S., FICD

    Associate Professor

    Medical University of South Carolina James B. Edwards College of Dental Medicine

    Dr. Rathore is an Associate Professor and Director of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology at the Medical University of South Carolina James B. Edwards College of Dental Medicine. Dr. Rathore completed her residency in Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology along with a T32 research CRSP fellowship from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Adams School of Dentistry. She previously served 12 years as a full-time faculty member at the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Dentistry in the Department of Oral Diagnostic Sciences. She is passionate about dental education and her research interests are in promoting radiology education, advanced imaging techniques and dosimetry.

    Dr. Rathore is a Diplomate of the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology. She is the Immediate Past-Chair of the ADEA Section on Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology. She has also served on various committees in her national organization, American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology (AAOMR), and is the current chair of their Awards Committee. She has several publications in peer-reviewed journals and has given continuing education lectures at both the national and international platform. She is a member of ADEA, AAOMR, the American Dental Association, International College of Dentists and the International Association of DentoMaxilloFacial Radiology.

    Speaker agrees that neither they nor members of their immediate family have any financial relationships with commercial entities that may be relevant to their presentation.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 05/17/2022

    Research supports active learning as an effective teaching method that promotes critical thinking, investigation and creativity. Based on constructivism, active learning theory enables learners to build upon prior knowledge and develop their own understanding of a topic. Today’s diverse learners seek educational environments where they can obtain knowledge and learn how to apply it through guided assignments. Join us for this webinar where Windy Rothmund, RDH, M.S.D.H., and Cheri Barton, RDH, M.S.D.H., both from Eastern Washington University, will demonstrate novel activities to engage allied health students and to foster deep, meaningful learning. During this webinar, participants will learn how to enhance student engagement through the application of active learning strategies.

    Research supports active learning as an effective teaching method that promotes critical thinking, investigation and creativity. Based on constructivism, active learning theory enables learners to build upon prior knowledge and develop their own understanding of a topic. Today’s diverse learners seek educational environments where they can obtain knowledge and learn how to apply it through guided assignments. Join us for this webinar where Windy Rothmund, RDH, M.S.D.H., and Cheri Barton, RDH, M.S.D.H., both from Eastern Washington University, will demonstrate novel activities to engage allied health students and to foster deep, meaningful learning. During this webinar, participants will learn how to enhance student engagement through the application of active learning strategies.

     

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Discuss the relationship between active learning and knowledge comprehension.
    2. Appraise current curriculum to determine need for active learning. 
    3. Identify novel active learning activities.

     

    Original Release Date: May 17, 2022

    Expiration Date: May 17, 2025

    Questions? Contact learn@adea.org

    CE Information:

    The American Dental Education Association is an ADA CERP Recognized Provider.

    An evaluation form is available to participants after the conclusion of the webinar. To earn continuing education (CE) credit for participation in the webinar, the online evaluation must be completed in full by May 17, 2025. After completing the evaluation, webinar participants can print and save the CE Verification Form.

    ADA CERP is a service of the American Dental Association to assist dental professionals in identifying quality providers of continuing dental education. ADA CERP does not approve or endorse individual courses or instructors, nor does it imply acceptance of credit hours by boards of dentistry.

    The American Dental Education Association designates this activity for 1.0 continuing education credit.

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    All speakers agree that neither they nor members of their immediate family have any financial relationships with commercial entities that may be relevant to their presentation.

    Windy Rothmund, RDH, M.S.D.H.

    Eastern Washington University

    Windy Rothmund has over 20 years of experience in private practice and is an assistant professor at Eastern Washington University in Spokane, Washington. Prof. Rothmund’s teaching roles include head and neck anatomy, histology and embryology, oral pathology, research, junior clinic lead, and graduate courses. She is an advocate for oral health and serves as past chair for the American Dental Education Association Section on Addiction Education, President of the Sigma Phi Alpha Supreme Chapter, and recipient of the 2022 ADEA Leadership Institute Phase V Leadership Development Tuition Scholarship.

    Speaker agrees that neither they nor members of their immediate family have any financial relationships with commercial entities that may be relevant to their presentation.

    Cheri Barton, RDH, M.S.D.H.

    Eastern Washington University

    Cheri Barton is a full-time faculty member at Eastern Washington University (EWU) in Spokane, Washington, and an Affiliate Faculty member with the University of Washington School of Dentistry (UW SOD). She is the senior clinic lead at EWU, and her teaching roles have included Radiology (lab and lecture), Senior Clinic II, III and IV, Periodontology I and II, and she is also the course director for Introduction to Periodontics for the UW SOD Regional Initiatives in Dental Education (RIDE) program. Prof. Barton is the recipient of the EWU College of Health Science and Public Health 2020 Deans Excellence Award. She is also an active member of the Supreme Chapter of Sigma Phi Alpha and was the 2021 President. Additionally, Prof. Barton serves as President of her local chapter of Sigma Phi Alpha.

    Speaker agrees that neither they nor members of their immediate family have any financial relationships with commercial entities that may be relevant to their presentation.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 05/11/2022

    Join us as we discuss how teledentistry can be used to collaboratively train dental hygiene and dental students in the principles of public health, caries risk assessment, prevention, treatment planning and intraprofessional collaboration. In this session, we will also discuss how teledentistry is being used to decrease barriers to preventive dental care for vulnerable and underserved populations, and how teledentistry can be used to help create dental homes.

    Join us as we discuss how teledentistry can be used to collaboratively train dental hygiene and dental students in the principles of public health, caries risk assessment, prevention, treatment planning and intraprofessional collaboration. In this session, we will also discuss how teledentistry is being used to decrease barriers to preventive dental care for vulnerable and underserved populations, and how teledentistry can be used to help create dental homes.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Describe how teledentistry has been used to help vulnerable populations gain access to preventive dental services.  
    2. Evaluate how collaborative agreements between the dental team can be used to provide preventive dental services to vulnerable populations through teledentistry. 
    3. Analyze how teledentistry can be used to teach dental hygiene and dental students.
    4. Theorize advantages and barriers to using teledentistry as an educational tool, and how to overcome these barriers.

    Original Release Date: May 4, 2022

    Expiration Date: May 4, 2025

    Questions? Contact learn@adea.org

    CE Information

    The American Dental Education Association is an ADA CERP Recognized Provider.

    An evaluation form is available to participants after the conclusion of the live webinar. To earn continuing education (CE) credit for participation in the webinar, the online evaluation must be completed in full by May 4, 2025. After completing the evaluation, webinar participants can print and save the CE Verification Form.

    ADA CERP is a service of the American Dental Association to assist dental professionals in identifying quality providers of continuing dental education. ADA CERP does not approve or endorse individual courses or instructors, nor does it imply acceptance of credit hours by boards of dentistry.

    The American Dental Education Association designates this activity for 1.00 continuing education credit.

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    All speakers agree that neither they nor members of their immediate family have any financial relationships with commercial entities that may be relevant to their presentation.

     


    David Stewart, D.D.S., M.P.H./H.S.A.

    Roseman University of Health Sciences College of Dental Medicine – South Jordan, Utah

    Dr. David Stewart, a Diplomate of the American Board of Pediatric Dentistry, completed a Bachelor of English from Brigham Young University, dual Master of Public Health and Health Services Administration from the University of Utah, a Doctor of Dental Surgery from the University of Iowa, and a certificate in Pediatric Dentistry from Primary Children’s Medical Center.  He currently serves as an Assistant Professor at Roseman University of Health Sciences College of Dental Medicine – South Jordan, Utah, an attending Pediatric Dentist at Primary Children's Hospital, a member of the Utah Oral Health Coalition Steering Committee, and one of MCNA's Utah Dental Directors.

    Speaker agrees that neither they nor members of their immediate family have any financial relationships with commercial entities that may be relevant to their presentation.

    Staci Stout

    Staci Stout RDH, B.S.D.H. has been part of the dental field for over 30 years. She has served in several leadership positions in her professional organization as well as a delegate for the American Dental Hygienists’ Association. She is an educator as well as an advocate for the underserved, creating public health dental hygiene clinics and providing dental care to those in need. She is a recipient of the Utah Dental Hygienists’ Association Outstanding Leadership and Dedicated Service Awards. She has also received the Innovator of the Year Award for Teledentistry. She believes access to oral healthcare should be available to everyone.

    Speaker agrees that neither they nor members of their immediate family have any financial relationships with commercial entities that may be relevant to their presentation.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 04/20/2022

    Expert clinicians can sometimes struggle with teaching complex ideas to novice learners. The cognitive apprenticeship framework offers a host of strategies to help experts make their thinking more visible when engaging with learners. In this session, participants will learn about the components of the cognitive apprenticeship framework and the associated strategies that can support their teaching in classroom and clinic environments. Participants will work collaboratively to develop a plan that outlines how they can integrate the strategies effectively into their practice and evaluate the impact on learning.

    Expert clinicians can sometimes struggle with teaching complex ideas to novice learners. The cognitive apprenticeship framework offers a host of strategies to help experts make their thinking more visible when engaging with learners. In this session, participants will learn about the components of the cognitive apprenticeship framework and the associated strategies that can support their teaching in classroom and clinic environments. Participants will work collaboratively to develop a plan that outlines how they can integrate the strategies effectively into their practice and evaluate the impact on learning.

     Learning Objectives 

    • Describe the cognitive apprenticeship framework as it relates to teaching in workplace environments.
    • Evaluate cognitive apprenticeship strategies that can applied to enhance the learning environment.
    • Develop a plan to integrate strategies to optimize learning in the workplace.

    Original Release Date: April 20, 2022

    Expiration Date: April 20, 2025

    Questions? Contact learn@adea.org

    CE Information

    The American Dental Education Association is an ADA CERP Recognized Provider.

    An evaluation form is available to participants after the conclusion of the live webinar. To earn continuing education (CE) credit for participation in the webinar, the online evaluation must be completed in full by April 20, 2025. After completing the evaluation, webinar participants can print and save the CE Verification Form.

    ADA CERP is a service of the American Dental Association to assist dental professionals in identifying quality providers of continuing dental education. ADA CERP does not approve or endorse individual courses or instructors, nor does it imply acceptance of credit hours by boards of dentistry.

    The American Dental Education Association designates this activity for 1.00 continuing education credit.

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    All speakers agree that neither they nor members of their immediate family have any financial relationships with commercial entities that may be relevant to their presentation.

    Jennifer Brame, Ed.D., M.S., RDH

    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Adams School of Dentistry

    Jennifer Brame, Ed.D., M.S., RDH, is a Professor in the Division of Comprehensive Oral Health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Adams School of Dentistry. She earned a Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene and Master of Science in Dental Hygiene Education from UNC Chapel Hill, and a Doctorate in Educational Leadership from Carson Newman University.  She is Director of Interprofessional Education & Practice and the Graduate Dental Hygiene Education Program. She currently teaches in undergraduate & graduate dental hygiene and pre-doctoral dental curricula, and is engaged in interprofessional education, curriculum and instructional design, and faculty development.  

    Speaker agrees that neither they nor members of their immediate family have any financial relationships with commercial entities that may be relevant to their presentation.

    ​Michael D. Wolcott, Pharm.D., Ph.D.

    High Point University School of Dental Medicine and Oral Health

    Michael D. Wolcott, Pharm.D., Ph.D. is the Assistant Dean for Curriculum, Innovation, and Assessment and associate professor at the High Point University School of Dental Medicine and Oral Health. He leads an active research agenda on creative problem-solving techniques, curriculum change management, and inclusive teaching practices. Previously, he served as the Director of Educational Resources and Scholarship at the UNC Adams School of Dentistry. He completed his PhD at the UNC School of Education specializing in the learning sciences. He received his Doctor of Pharmacy from the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and completed pharmacy residency at Duke University Hospital.

    Speaker agrees that neither they nor members of their immediate family have any financial relationships with commercial entities that may be relevant to their presentation.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 02/03/2022

    Join us for this live webinar where Dr. Chaitanya Puranik will share how University of Colorado School of Dental Medicine implemented PBL in its Pediatric Dentistry Predoctoral Program. During this presentation, Dr. Puranik will discuss the blueprint of the implementation process as well as outcomes after the implementation. He’ll also explore the multiple strategies for evaluations, and the benefits to student progress and learning.

    Problem-based learning (PBL) has been a valuable addition to health-based curricula and has enhanced education through discussion, research, and critical analysis of evidence in a peer-supported learning format. In PBL, the problem serves as a stimulus and helps students’ clinical decision-making by connecting basic knowledge with clinical application. The PBL format in dental education is based on adult learning theory approach where adult learners are independent, self-directed, interested in problem-solving approaches and motivated by internal rather than external drives. PBL-enhanced curriculum requires students to function at a higher level of autonomy and creativity than a traditional curriculum.

    Join us for this live webinar where Dr. Chaitanya Puranik will share how University of Colorado School of Dental Medicine implemented PBL in its Pediatric Dentistry Predoctoral Program. During this presentation, Dr. Puranik will discuss the blueprint of the implementation process as well as outcomes after the implementation. He’ll also explore the multiple strategies for evaluations, and the benefits to student progress and learning. 

    Learning Objectives: 

    • Discuss detailed planning and implementation of PBL in a predoctoral dental program.
    • Analyze a video example of a PBL student assessment from a predoctoral dental program.
    • Discuss the outcomes of PBL implementation in a predoctoral dental program. 

    Original Release Date: February 3, 2022

    Expiration Date: February 3, 2025

    Questions? Contact learn@adea.org

    CE Information

    The American Dental Education Association is an ADA CERP Recognized Provider.

    An evaluation form is available to participants after the conclusion of the live webinar. To earn continuing education (CE) credit for participation in the webinar, the online evaluation must be completed in full by February 3, 2025. After completing the evaluation, webinar participants can print and save the CE Verification Form.

    ADA CERP is a service of the American Dental Association to assist dental professionals in identifying quality providers of continuing dental education. ADA CERP does not approve or endorse individual courses or instructors, nor does it imply acceptance of credit hours by boards of dentistry.

    The American Dental Education Association designates this activity for 1.0 continuing education credit.

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    All speakers agree that neither they nor members of their immediate family have any financial relationships with commercial entities that may be relevant to their presentation.

    Chaitanya P. Puranik, B.D.S., M.S., M.Dent.Sci., Ph. D.

    Dr. Puranik is a Diplomate of American Board of Pediatric Dentistry. He received his dental degree from India. He completed his Master of Science degree in Dental Biomaterials from The State University of New York at Buffalo. Later, he earned his doctoral degree in Oral Biology and a Certificate in Operative Dentistry from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

    Dr. Puranik completed his Pediatric Dentistry training and Craniofacial Fellowship from the University of Connecticut. He has served on various leadership positions at state, national and international levels and has published evidence-based articles in reputed peer-review journals.

    Speaker agrees that neither they nor members of their immediate family have any financial relationships with commercial entities that may be relevant to their presentation.

  • Contains 4 Component(s)

    The ADEA Micro-credential on Facilitating Small Group Learning is a demonstration of the individual’s ability to facilitate groups of adult learners through an educational process with clearly defined outcomes.


    Welcome to the ADEA Micro-credential on Facilitating Small Group Learning!


    What are ADEA Micro-credentials?

    ADEA Micro-credentials are a rigorous method for assessing a knowledge and skills related to a specific topic area. The micro-credential program supports recognition of participants’ efforts toward lifelong learning, self-directed learning, evidence-based practice and focused skills development in targeted areas. Learn more about the overall program here


    What are the goals and requirements of the "Facilitating Small Group Learning" micro-credential? 

    This micro-credential is a demonstration of the individual’s ability to facilitate groups of adult learners through an educational process with clearly defined outcomes.

    It specifically focuses on: 

    • Practicing comprehensive, empathetic, and reflective listening in the student-facilitation process.
    • Using communication techniques and critical reflection to stimulate students to explore the thinking behind practices and behaviors within a learning environment (cognitive coaching). 
    • Providing a space for feedback and self-assessment.  
    • Demonstrating an awareness of the dynamics of communication with diverse/cross-cultural groups and the practice of sensitivity, empathy and familiarity with people of different backgrounds.  

    Select the "Micro-credential Overview" and "Overview and Rubrics" tabs above to learn more. Each ADEA Micro-credential contains three main sections: 1.) Overview Questions, 2.) Reflection Questions, and 3.) Portfolio Artifact submission(s). Each section has an associated rubric that is pass/fail. 


    How do I apply?

    Select "Register" in the upper right of this page and proceed to the checkout. Once purchased, you can submit your responses and evidence at any time under the "Submit" tab. Please be sure your submission meets the "proficient" criteria as outlined in each of the three rubrics associated with this micro-credential. 


    When are submissions due?

    Submissions are collected on Jan. 15th and July 15th for review. Any submissions received before those cutoff dates will be peer-reviewed with the results communicated approximately eight weeks later. 

    • Example: A submission completed on June 1 would be included in the July 15 review cycle, with results communicated by mid-Sept. 


    What do I earn if successful?

    If successfully completed, each micro-credential submission will earn a verifiable digital badge that can be displayed in social media profiles, CVs and email signatures. When someone (e.g., a peer, current or prospective employer) views the meta-data, they can see when you earned the badge, what requirements it took to earn the micro-credential and even the work sample you submitted (if requested). 


    Can I resubmit?

    Yes! If the original submission does not meet the requirements as outlined in the rubrics, you can revise and resubmit at no extra charge. 


    Note: For a PDF version of this document as well as the associated grading rubrics, see the "Overview and Rubrics (PDF)" tab.


    Overall Goal

    This micro-credential is a demonstration of the individual’s ability to facilitate groups of adult learners through an educational process with clearly defined outcomes.


    Objectives and Outcomes

    • Practice comprehensive, empathetic, and reflective listening in the student-facilitation process.
    • Use communication techniques and critical reflection to stimulate students to explore the thinking behind their practices and behaviors within a learning environment (cognitive coaching).
    • Provide a space for feedback and self-assessment.  
    • Demonstrate an awareness of the dynamics of communication with diverse/cross-cultural groups and the practice of sensitivity, empathy and familiarity with people of different backgrounds.


    Rationale and Supporting Research

    These two references provide a wide scope of research, experience and outcomes examining the role of facilitators in student-centered learning. Both include a range of specific facilitator roles with examples of successful implementation and existing challenges within educational institutions.

    • Savin-Baden, M. (2003). Facilitating Problem-based Learning: Illuminating Perspectives. The Society for Research into Higher Education & Open University 
    • Barrows, Howard S. (1988) The Tutorial Process. Revised Edition. SIU School of Medicine. Springfield, Ill.


    Sample Resources

    • Burgess, A., van Diggele, C., Roberts, C. et al. Facilitating small group learning in the health professions. BMC Med Educ 20, 457 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12909... 
    • Team-based Learning Collaborative: Upcoming TBL Workshops Around the Globe https://teambasedlearning.org/... 
    • SIU School of Medicine The Facilitation and Evaluation of Problem Based-Learning in Virtual Settings workshop: https://www.siumed.edu/academy...  
    • Lakey, G. (2020). Facilitating Group Learning: Strategies for Success with Diverse Learners. PM Press. 
    • National Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education: T3 Train the Trainer—Interprofessional Team Development Program: https://nexusipe.org/T3 
    • Steinert, Y. (1996). Twelve tips for effective small group teaching in the health professions, Medical Teacher, 18, 203-207.


    Submission Criteria and Evaluation Guidelines

    Section 1: Overview Questions (See Grading Rubric for Evaluation Criteria)

    1. Motivation – Explain the reasons that make this micro-credential meaningful for you.  In addressing this, reflect upon and discuss the value this micro-credential has for your professional work and practice as an educator. Specifically, explain how this micro-credential supports or enhances your professional development as a facilitator/facilitator-trainer within dental and interprofessional health care education.

      [Your response should be in text format; 250-word minimum.]
    2. Training – Provide the three most significant and impactful resources used to support your development of knowledge and skills as a facilitator/facilitator-trainer. These resources can include individual training, facilitation-related courses and/or workshops, learning experiences, individual study of relevant literature or other formal/informal professional development. Describe each resource or activity and how it supported your learning of the knowledge and skills of facilitation as outlined in this micro-credential’s objectives. You must include a minimum of three examples together with citations or links for each resource. To the extent possible, demonstrate variety in the format or type of learning resources included.

      [Your response should be in text format and between 250-500 words.]
    3. Outcomes – Quote or describe two examples that highlight and support your efficacy as a facilitator/facilitator-trainer. One example should be feedback given to you for facilitation of students or as a facilitator trainer. A second example of an outcome supporting your efficacy can be of your choice. Analyze the feedback, considering the objectives and outcomes of this micro-credential. In other words, how does the feedback support your level of knowledge and skill as a facilitator/facilitator-trainer? In what way does the feedback/outcome measurement suggest the need for further development of your knowledge and skills as a facilitator/facilitator-trainer? Examples of feedback may be gathered from e-evaluation or facsimile, written peer review or student review, recorded feedback session or other any similar document.

      [Your analysis should be in text format and have a 250-word minimum.] 
    4. Facilitator Credentialing – Compare and contrast institutional practices for facilitator recruitment, training and professional development. Provide two examples of different training approaches, how they prepare individuals to facilitate and assess the effectiveness of the training approach. Include a discussion of the relevant literature that supports particular training/development practices. 

      Include a descriptive outline of each facilitator training experience with link to training program, if possible. 

      [Your analysis should be in text format and have a 250-word minimum.] 
    5. Preparation and Communication – “Effective facilitation requires an intentional state of mind to engage learners in the cognitive processes associated with learning through specific pedagogies (problem-based learning, team-based learning, case-based learning, etc.).” Analyze this statement as it relates to your training and practice as a facilitator. Specifically, explain how an effective facilitator can mentally prepare for a learning session and describe the communication skills associated with that preparation. In what ways did facilitator training prepare you to develop these skills? Support your statements and practices with two or three examples from the literature.
       
      [Your analysis should be in text format and have a 250-word minimum.]
    6. Community Engagement – All applications must also include evidence of community engagement within the topic area. Applicants should demonstrate evidence of community engagement through one or more of the following:
      a. Attendance and/or presentations at appropriate conferences,
      b. Attendance and/or presentation of relevant webinars or
      c. ADEA Connect participation on relevant discussion boards.

      [You may include written descriptions or links as evidence of your participation in these activities.]


    Section 2: Reflection Questions (See Grading Rubric for Evaluation Criteria)

    1. Critical Assessment of Portfolio Artifacts – Provide a critical assessment of your submitted artifacts. Structure your reflection to address the following:
      a. What was your primary purpose or goal in creating this work? Who is the intended audience for this work and what is the intended use or application?
      b. How is your work informed by current information, literature and practices in this topic area?
      c. How have you been able to or how will you assess the effectiveness or impact of your work?

      [Your response must be text-based and at least 1,000 words.]
    2. Relevant Ethical Considerations – Provide a summary and description of relevant ethical considerations around this topic area and describe how you might elect to address these ethical challenges. Some examples of ethical considerations may address the following: 
      • Use of patient-based information included in cases, 
      • Appropriate use of adapted materials (rubrics, cases) and student resources (copyright or trademarked material), 
      • Institutional review board (IRB) approval or exemption for facilitation research or 
      • Any other relevant ethical consideration for this topic area.

      [Your response must be text-based and at least 500 words.
    3. Supporting Diversity, Equity and Inclusion – In what ways can work in this topic area support diversity, equity and inclusion efforts? Provide specific, actionable suggestions or recommendations. You may choose to focus on application of these efforts toward the following:
      • Patient experience and patient care; 
      • Experience of learners in the learning environment; 
      • Legislation, policies or practices that directly support diversity, equity and inclusion efforts; or 
      • Other relevant applications. 

      [Your response must be text-based and at least 500 words.]


    Section 3: Portfolio Artifact (See Grading Rubric for Evaluation Criteria)

    Submission Criteria: Upload up to three portfolio artifacts that support your achievement of the overall micro-credential goal through demonstration of the goals, objectives and outcomes listed at the beginning of this document. Your artifact(s) should relate to the responses provided in Sections 1 and 2. 

    Acceptable artifacts include but are not limited to the following:
    • Published peer-reviewed articles;
    • Audio or video recordings of educational session(s) or facilitation training session(s);
    • Facilitation training materials that you developed or helped develop;
    • Examples of feedback given for your facilitator or facilitator-trainer activities; or
    • An outcome measurement of your choice. These can be the same or different than materials referenced in Section 1.3 (e.g., facilitator journal or blog, criteria-based self-assessment or activities or educational material developed as a facilitator.)

  • Contains 4 Component(s)

    The ADEA Micro-credential on Promoting an Inclusive and Humanistic Learning Environment focuses on creating an inclusive and humanistic learning environment for the oral health program students, faculty and/or staff.


    Welcome to the ADEA Micro-credential on Promoting an Inclusive and Humanistic Learning Environment!


    What are ADEA Micro-credentials?

    ADEA Micro-credentials are a rigorous method for assessing a knowledge and skills related to a specific topic area. The micro-credential program supports recognition of participants’ efforts toward lifelong learning, self-directed learning, evidence-based practice and focused skills development in targeted areas. Learn more about the overall program here


    What are the goals and requirements of the "Promoting an Inclusive and Humanistic Learning Environment" micro-credential? 

    This micro-credential focuses on promoting an inclusive and humanistic learning environment (IHLE), e.g., physical and virtual classroom, simulation center, clinic or community venues, for the oral health (dental schools and/or allied health) program students, faculty and/or staff.

    It specifically focuses on: 

    • Demonstrating a thorough understanding of fundamental knowledge of concepts, skills and methods that support inclusive and humanistic learning environments. 
    • Incorporating current and emerging literature and best practices for IHLE in their academic programs. 
    • Creating and/or providing learning resources that lead to the development and support of an inclusive and humanistic program/course in the classroom.  
    • Evaluating and/or showing the impact and effectiveness of the IHLE program or activity.  

    Select the "Micro-credential Overview" and "Overview and Rubrics" tabs above to learn more. Each ADEA Micro-credential contains three main sections: 1.) Overview Questions, 2.) Reflection Questions, and 3.) Portfolio Artifact submission(s). Each section has an associated rubric that is pass/fail. 


    How do I apply?

    Select "Register" in the upper right of this page and proceed to the checkout. Once purchased, you can submit your responses and evidence at any time under the "Submit" tab. Please be sure your submission meets the "proficient" criteria as outlined in each of the three rubrics associated with this micro-credential. 


    When are submissions due?

    Submissions are collected on Jan. 15th and July 15th for review. Any submissions received before those cutoff dates will be peer-reviewed with the results communicated approximately eight weeks later. 

    • Example: A submission completed on June 1 would be included in the July 15 review cycle, with results communicated by mid-Sept. 


    What do I earn if successful?

    If successfully completed, each micro-credential submission will earn a verifiable digital badge that can be displayed in social media profiles, CVs and email signatures. When someone (e.g., a peer, current or prospective employer) views the meta-data, they can see when you earned the badge, what requirements it took to earn the micro-credential and even the work sample you submitted (if requested). 


    Can I resubmit?

    Yes! If the original submission does not meet the requirements as outlined in the rubrics, you can revise and resubmit at no extra charge. 


    Note: For a PDF version of this document as well as the associated grading rubrics, see the "Overview and Rubrics (PDF)" tab.


    Overall Goal

    Promote an inclusive and humanistic learning environment (IHLE), e.g., physical and virtual classroom, simulation center, clinic or community venues, for the oral health (dental schools and/or allied health) program students, faculty and/or staff.


    Objectives and Outcomes

    • Demonstrate a thorough understanding of fundamental knowledge of concepts, skills and methods that support inclusive and humanistic learning environments. 
    • Incorporate current and emerging literature and best practices for IHLE in their academic programs. 
    • Create and/or provide learning resources that lead to the development and support of an inclusive and humanistic program/course in the classroom.  
    • Evaluate and/or show the impact and effectiveness of the IHLE program or activity.


    Rationale and Supporting Research

    Research has demonstrated that humanistic learning environments impact student learning, as well as retention of students, faculty and staff. Please see the supporting literature listed below.

    Academic Climate and Student Success 
    Razack and Philibert 2019. Inclusion in the clinical learning environment: building the conditions for diverse human flourishing. MEDICAL TEACHER 2019, VOL. 41, NO. 4, 380–384 https://doi.org/10.1080/014215...  

    Psychological Safety 
    Rudolph, J. W., Raemer, D. B. & Simon, R. (2014). Establishing a Safe Container for Learning in Simulation. Simulation in Healthcare: Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare, 9 (6), 339-349. doi: 10.1097/SIH.0000000000000047

    Student Perspectives About Humanistic Academic Environments
    Quick, K. K., Overman, P., Sposetti, V., (2018). Identifying Needs to Ensure a Humanistic Academic Dental Environment: A Multi-Site Survey of Dental Students’ Perspectives. Journal of Dental Education. Volume 82, Number 11 https://doi.org/10.21815/JDE.0... 


    Sample Resources

    1. Podcast: Teaching in Higher Ed by Bonni Stachowiak 

      Overview: Hosted by Bonni Stachowiak, The Teaching in Higher Ed Podcast airs weekly. The podcast focuses on topics such as excellence in teaching, instructional design, open education, diversity and inclusion, productivity, creativity in teaching, educational technology and blended learning. 
    2. ADEA eLearn Webinar Archives (elearn.adea.org)

      Recommended webinars: 
      - The ADEA Climate Study: Advancing a Humanistic Environment and Transformation in Dental Education (View)
      - Belongingness as a Pathway to Diversity and Inclusion in Dental Education (View
    3. ADEA Access, Diversity and Inclusion Portfolio (https://www.adea.org/adi/
    4. MedEdPORTAL (https://www.mededportal.org/diversity-inclusion-and-health-equity)


    Submission Criteria and Evaluation Guidelines

    Section 1: Overview Questions (See Grading Rubric for Evaluation Criteria)

    1. Motivation – Why is this micro-credential meaningful or significant for you? Please discuss the value this micro-credential has for your professional work and practice. Specifically, explain how this micro-credential supports or enhances your professional development within dental education. 

      [Response Format Options: 300-500 words written in first-person narrative style OR a 2- to 4-minute video]
    2. Training/Development – List and describe the three most significant or impactful resources used to support your development of relevant knowledge and skills in this area (e.g., activities, training, courses, learning experiences, individual study of important literature or other formal or informal professional development). Describe each activity or resource and explain how it supported your learning/development in this area. You must include a minimum of three examples and must include citations or links for any resources that you cite. To the extent possible, demonstrate variety in the format or type of learning experiences you discuss.

      [Response Format: 500-750 words (excluding citations) written in first-person narrative style]
    3. Needs Assessment and Decision-making Process – Please describe any factors you believe were essential and were included in the development of the program. For example, describe how you determined/assessed the interests, needs and expectations of students, staff and/or faculty before developing the program. Describe two to three (2-3) strategies/methods that you considered and/or used to create the program and your rationale and decision-making process to select the one(s) that you implemented.

      [Response Format Options: 500-750 words written in first-person narrative style OR 2- to 4-minutes video]
    4. Community engagement – Please provide evidence that demonstrate your community engagement within the area of developing inclusive and humanistic learning environments. Acceptable evidence includes, but are not limited to, the following:
      - Actively participate in local, regional or national professional learning communities.
      - Actively participate in ADEA and/or other professional organizations.
      - Actively participate at conferences, webinars or other professional development events.
      - Actively participate in cross-institutional and cross-disciplinary collaboration.
      - Others, as applicable

      [You may include written descriptions and/or links as evidence of your participation in these activities.]


    Section 2: Reflection Questions (See Grading Rubric for Evaluation Criteria)

    1. Critical Assessment of Portfolio Work – Provide a critical assessment of your submitted work. Structure your reflection to address the following:
      a. What was your primary purpose or goal in creating this work? Who is the intended audience for this work and what is the intended use or application?
      b. How is your work informed by current information, literature and practices in this topic area?
      c. How have you been able to (or how will you) assess the effectiveness or impact of your work? Are there any limitations to your assessment and how may you address these challenges moving forward?

      [Your response must be text-based and at least 1,000 words.]
    2. Relevant Ethical Considerations – Provide a summary and description of relevant ethical considerations around this topic area and describe how you might elect to address these ethical challenges. You may choose to focus on: 
      - Particular populations at risk of being disadvantaged by work in this area; 
      - Challenges and risks associated with data collection, data maintenance or data use; 
      - Legal considerations, such as copyright or trademark law; or
      - Any other relevant ethical consideration for this topic area.

      [Your response must be text-based and at least 500 words.
    3. Supporting Diversity, Equity and Inclusion – In what ways can work in this topic area support diversity, equity and inclusion efforts outside of the dental education setting? Provide specific, actionable suggestions or recommendations as well as potential limitations of these efforts. You may choose to focus on application of these efforts toward 
      - Patient experience and patient care; 
      - Legislation, policies or practices that directly support diversity, equity and inclusion efforts; or 
      - Other relevant applications. 

      [Your response must be text-based and at least 500 words.]


    Section 3: Portfolio Artifact (See Grading Rubric for Evaluation Criteria)

    Submission Criteria:

    Submit at least one artifact that demonstrates your efforts to promote an inclusive and humanistic learning environment for the oral health (dental schools and/or allied health) program students, faculty and/or staff. The artifact(s) must address each of the objectives and outcomes as outlined in this document and be the focus of your previous responses in Sections 1 and 2. 

    The following are examples of evidence of work in this area:

    • A sample lesson plan and/or related course materials. Examples include but are not limited to:
      o Classroom (physical or virtual) – syllabus, PowerPoints, videos, reading materials, problem-based learning;
      o Simulation center – cases, Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE), Team Observed Structured Clinical Encounter (TOSCE), rubrics, case-based learning;
      o Clinic – inclusive and humanistic patient-centered competency practices, e.g., disabilities, language barriers, health literacy or empathy to patients’ beliefs; or
      o Community outreach/service – inclusive and humanistic patient-centered competency practices, e.g., disabilities, language barriers, health literacy or empathy to patients’ beliefs. 
    • A classroom recording of a learning activity 
    • Publications
    • Documentation and outcomes of work on a related school committee/task force 
    • A community or professional development event that you organized or helped to plan 
    • Others, as applicable to the objectives and outcomes of this micro-credential
  • Contains 4 Component(s)

    The ADEA Micro-credential on Promoting Critical Thinking focuses on an individual's demonstration of the fundamental knowledge, skills and methods needed to teach and assess critical thinking.


    Welcome to the ADEA Micro-credential on Promoting Critical Thinking!


    What are ADEA Micro-credentials?

    ADEA Micro-credentials are a rigorous method for assessing a knowledge and skills related to a specific topic area. The micro-credential program supports recognition of participants’ efforts toward lifelong learning, self-directed learning, evidence-based practice and focused skills development in targeted areas. Learn more about the overall program here


    What are the goals and requirements of the "Promoting Critical Thinking" micro-credential? 

    This micro-credential focuses on an individual's demonstration of the fundamental knowledge, skills and methods needed to teach and assess critical thinking. It specifically focuses on: 

    • Explaining a conception of critical thinking in detail.  
    • Creating educational material and/or activities to explicitly teach and apply foundational critical thinking skills. 
    • Describing how to assess learners' performance in critical thinking. 

    Select the "Micro-credential Overview" and "Overview and Rubrics" tabs above to learn more. Each ADEA Micro-credential contains three main sections: 1.) Overview Questions, 2.) Reflection Questions, and 3.) Portfolio Artifact submission(s). Each section has an associated rubric that is pass/fail. 


    How do I apply?

    Select "Register" in the upper right of this page and proceed to the checkout. Once purchased, you can submit your responses and evidence at any time under the "Submit" tab. Please be sure your submission meets the "proficient" criteria as outlined in each of the three rubrics associated with this micro-credential. 


    When are submissions due?

    Submissions are collected on Jan. 15th and July 15th for review. Any submissions received before those cutoff dates will be peer-reviewed with the results communicated approximately eight weeks later. 

    • Example: A submission completed on June 1 would be included in the July 15 review cycle, with results communicated by mid-Sept. 


    What do I earn if successful?

    If successfully completed, each micro-credential submission will earn a verifiable digital badge that can be displayed in social media profiles, CVs and email signatures. When someone (e.g., a peer, current or prospective employer) views the meta-data, they can see when you earned the badge, what requirements it took to earn the micro-credential and even the work sample you submitted (if requested). 


    Can I resubmit?

    Yes! If the original submission does not meet the requirements as outlined in the rubrics, you can revise and resubmit at no extra charge. 


    Note: For a PDF version of this document as well as the associated grading rubrics, see the "Overview and Rubrics (PDF)" tab.


    Overall Goal

    Explicitly demonstrate the fundamental knowledge, skills and methods needed to teach and assess critical thinking.


    Objectives and Outcomes

    • Explain a conception of critical thinking in detail.  
    • Create educational material and/or activities to explicitly teach and apply foundational critical thinking skills. 
    • Describe how to assess learners’ performance in critical thinking.


    Rationale and Supporting Research

    Critical thinking is emphasized in dental education of North America. In fact, Standard 2-10 by the Commission on Dental Accreditation states that “Graduates must be competent in the use of critical thinking and problem-solving, including their use in the comprehensive care of patients, scientific inquiry and research methodology.” More recently, the concept has gained heightened attention due to the introduction of the Integrated National Dental Board Examination (INBDE), which emphasizes dental curricula that promotes understanding concepts as opposed to rote memorization of facts or procedural algorithms. 

    Facione P. Critical thinking: a statement of expert consensus for purpose of educational assessment and instruction. Research finding and recommendations. Newark: American Philosophical Association, 1990. 

    Whitney E M, Aleksejuniene J, Walton J N. Critical thinking disposition and skills in dental students: development and relationship to academic outcomes. J Dent Educ 2016; 80: 948-958

    Johnsen DC, Finkelstein MW, Marshall TA, Chalkley YM. A model for critical thinking measurement of dental school performance. J Dent Educ 2009; 73(2):177–83.


    Sample Resources

    1. Paul, Richard, Elder, Linda. Critical Thinking: Tools for Taking Charge of Your Learning and Your Life. Rowman & Littlefield.
    2. ADEA, Overview of Critical Thinking Skills. https://www.adea.org/adeacci/r...   
    3. criticalthinking.org   
    4. Nosich, Gerald M. Learning to Think Things Through: A Guide to Critical Thinking across the Curriculum. 2014.  
    5. Ambrose, Susan A. How Learning Works: Seven Research-Based Principles for Smart Teaching. Jossey-Bass, 2010.  
    6. Nilson, Linda Burzotta. Infusing Critical Thinking Into Your Course: A Concrete, Practical Approach. Stylus Publishing, LLC, 2021. 
    7. Hendricson, W. et al. Educational strategies associated with development of problem-solving, critical thinking, and self-directed learning. ADEA Commission on Change and Innovation in Dental Education 2006.


    Submission Criteria and Evaluation Guidelines

    Section 1: Overview Questions (See Grading Rubric for Evaluation Criteria)

    1. Motivation – Why is the topic of teaching and assessing critical thinking meaningful for you? Please discuss the value this micro-credential has for your professional work and practice. Specifically, explain how teaching and assessing critical thinking supports or enhances your professional development within dental education. 

      [Your response should be text-based and between 500-750 words.
    2. Training – Provide the three (3) most significant or impactful resources used to support your development of relevant knowledge and skills in this area (e.g., activities, training, courses, learning experiences, individual study of important literature or other formal or informal professional development). Describe each activity or resource and explain how it supported your learning in this area. You must include a minimum of three examples and must include citations or links for any resources that you cite. To the extent possible, demonstrate variety in the format or type of learning experiences you discuss. 

      [Your response must be text-based and between 500-750 words.
    3. Concept – What is critical thinking? Describe in detail your conception of critical thinking, and how it would apply to your specific area of dental education. 

      [Your response must be text-based and between 500-750 words.] 
    4. Assessment – How do you support the current assessment of your learners’ critical thinking skills? How do you create assessments that enable an active learning and decision-making environment? 

      [Your response must be text-based and between 500-750 words.
    5. Community Engagement – Provide evidence of community engagement within the area of teaching and assessment of critical thinking. Acceptable evidence may include registration for a relevant workshop and/or conference, or a presentation on critical thinking teaching and assessment at a relevant workshop and/or conference. The evidence may also include participation in an ADEA Connect discussion board or engagement with a community partner.

      [You may include written descriptions or links as evidence of your participation in these activities.]


    Section 2: Reflection Questions (See Grading Rubric for Evaluation Criteria)

    1. Critical Assessment of Portfolio Work – Provide a self-assessment of your submitted portfolio artifacts. Address the following aspects:
      - What was your primary purpose or goal in creating these works?
      - Who is the intended audience and what is the intended use or application?
      - How is your work informed by current information, literature and practices in this topic area?
      - How have you been able to or how will you assess the effectiveness or impact of your work?
      - As you reflect on your work, how do you plan to make revisions or change directions?

      [Your response must be text-based and between 1,000-1,250 words.]
    2. Relevant Ethical Considerations – Provide a summary and description of relevant ethical considerations associated with teaching and assessing critical thinking and describe how you might elect to address these ethical challenges. Complex topics with social/ethical relevance in practicing dentistry can be engaging for students, provide a real-world context for learning classroom content and foster critical thinking. You may choose to focus on such examples or any other relevant ethical consideration you deem appropriate for this topic area. 

      [Your response must be text-based and between 500-750 words.
    3. Supporting Diversity, Equity and Inclusion – In what ways can work in this topic area support diversity, equity and inclusion efforts in dental education? How can critical thinking skills help to decrease institutional bias in patient care? Provide specific, actionable suggestions or recommendations. You may choose to focus on application of these efforts toward the following:
      - Patient experience and patient care; 
      - Experience of learners in the learning environment; 
      - Legislation, policies or practices that directly support diversity, equity and inclusion efforts; or 
      - Other relevant applications.  

      [Your response must be text-based and between 500-750 words.]


    Section 3: Portfolio Artifact (See Grading Rubric for Evaluation Criteria)

    Submission Criteria: A minimum of three (3) artifacts are needed for submission. The artifacts should support and reflect your previous responses in Sections 1 and 2, and should include the following:

    • At least two (2) artifacts should be evidence to support the educational material and/or activities you have created to teach foundational critical thinking skills. 
    • At least one (1) artifact should be related to learners’ assessments and feedback in critical thinking. 

    Potential formats for each artifact include: 

    • Peer-reviewed manuscripts, 
    • Lesson plans,
    • Learning activities, 
    • Learning session materials (files or recordings), 
    • Videos, Role-play videos and/or scripts, 
    • Presentation recordings, 
    • Case studies, Case materials for use in educational settings or
    • Workshop materials.
  • Contains 4 Component(s)

    The ADEA Micro-credential on Technology Integration in Didactic Teaching focuses on an individual's demonstration of effective contemporary technology integration in didactic teaching


    Welcome to the ADEA Micro-credential on Technology Integration in Didactic Teaching!


    What are ADEA Micro-credentials?

    ADEA Micro-credentials are a rigorous method for assessing a knowledge and skills related to a specific topic area. The micro-credential program supports recognition of participants’ efforts toward lifelong learning, self-directed learning, evidence-based practice and focused skills development in targeted areas. Learn more about the overall program here


    What are the goals and requirements of the "Technology Integration in Didactic Teaching" micro-credential? 

    This micro-credential focuses on an individual's demonstration of effective contemporary technology integration in didactic teaching. It specifically focuses on: 

    • Appling technology to support active and collaborative learning and promote critical thinking.  
    • Customizing technology to accommodate diverse learners. 
    • Assessing the effectiveness of technology integration. 
    • Keeping abreast of the latest development in educational technology for didactic teaching.

    Select the "Micro-credential Overview" and "Overview and Rubrics" tabs above to learn more. Each ADEA Micro-credential contains three main sections: 1.) Overview Questions, 2.) Reflection Questions, and 3.) Portfolio Artifact submission(s). Each section has an associated rubric that is pass/fail. 


    How do I apply?

    Select "Register" in the upper right of this page and proceed to the checkout. Once purchased, you can submit your responses and evidence at any time under the "Submit" tab. Please be sure your submission meets the "proficient" criteria as outlined in each of the three rubrics associated with this micro-credential. 


    When are submissions due?

    Submissions are collected on Jan. 15th and July 15th for review. Any submissions received before those cutoff dates will be peer-reviewed with the results communicated approximately eight weeks later. 

    • Example: A submission completed on June 1 would be included in the July 15 review cycle, with results communicated by mid-Sept. 


    What do I earn if successful?

    If successfully completed, each micro-credential submission will earn a verifiable digital badge that can be displayed in social media profiles, CVs and email signatures. When someone (e.g., a peer, current or prospective employer) views the meta-data, they can see when you earned the badge, what requirements it took to earn the micro-credential and even the work sample you submitted (if requested). 


    Can I resubmit?

    Yes! If the original submission does not meet the requirements as outlined in the rubrics, you can revise and resubmit at no extra charge. 


    Note: For a PDF version of this document as well as the associated grading rubrics, see the "Overview and Rubrics (PDF)" tab.

    Overall Goal

    This micro-credential is a demonstration of the individual’s ability to integrate contemporary technology effectively in didactic teaching, and recognition of their achievement and contribution to advancing collaborative efforts in the area of technology-enhanced learning in dental education.

    Objectives and Outcomes

    • Apply technology to support active and collaborative learning and promote critical thinking.  
    • Customize technology to accommodate diverse learners. 
    • Assess the effectiveness of technology integration. 
    • Keep abreast of the latest development in educational technology for didactic teaching.

    Rationale and Supporting Research

    Effective technology integration could make learning more flexible and personalized, support social interactions and collaboration, and provide students with access to rich learning resources (Han, Yeo, Kim, et al., 2019). The 2021 Educause Horizon Report identified increased use of digital technology as one of the trends that will shape the future of higher education. Technology has become an integral part of students’ learning experience. It is critical for health professions educators to embrace technology in their teaching to support students’ success and prepare them to practice in a digitalized healthcare environment (Freidman, Doanldson, and Vantsevich, 2016).

    • EDUCAUSE Horizon Report: Teaching and Learning Edition. 2021. https://library.educause.edu/r... 
    • Friedman, C. P., Donaldson, K. M., & Vantsevich, A. V. (2016). Educating medical students in the era of ubiquitous information. Medical teacher, 38(5), 504-509
    • Han, E. R., Yeo, S., Kim, M. J., Lee, Y. H., Park, K. H., & Roh, H. (2019). Medical education trends for future physicians in the era of advanced technology and artificial intelligence: an integrative review. BMC medical education, 19(1), 1-15.

    Sample Resources

    1. Bower, M. & Torrington, J. (2020). Typology of free web-based learning technologies [PDF]
      https://library.educause.edu/r... 
      Overview: This paper provides a list of 226 technologies categorized into 40 types that instructors can use to promote active learning.  
    2. The SAMR model for technology integration [Video]
      https://www.commonsense.org/ed...
      Overview: The SAMR model developed by Dr. Ruben Puentedura can help instructors evaluate and reflect on how they are integrating technology. It guides instructors to use technology in innovative ways to transform student learning.  
    3. Keengwe, J. (Ed.). (2015). Handbook of research on educational technology integration and active learning. IGI Global.
      https://www.google.com/books/e...
      Overview: This book contains a series of case report studies on how technology is integrated across disciplines and grade levels.

    Submission Criteria and Evaluation Guidelines

    Section 1: Overview Questions (See Grading Rubric for Evaluation Criteria)

    1. Motivation: Why is this micro-credential meaningful for you? Please discuss the value this micro-credential has for you as a dental educator, with a special focus on how this micro-credential supports or enhances your professional development within dental education.   

      [Your response can be in text, audio, or video format. Text: 200-300 words. Audio or video:2-3 minutes.]
    2. Training: Provide the three most significant resources that you used to develop your knowledge and skill of technology integration in didactic teaching. Examples include but are not limited to learning communities, activities, training, courses, research, study of literature, or other formal or informal professional development experiences that you participated in. Describe each activity/resource and explain how it supported your learning and skill development in this area. You must include at least three examples and include citations or links for any resources that you cite whenever applicable. To the extent possible, demonstrate variety in the format or type of learning experiences that you discuss.

      [Your response can be in text, audio, or video format. Text: 200-300 words. Audio or video: 2-3 minutes.]
    3. Action: How could technology integration augment and transform student learning experience in the didactic teaching context? Please focus your discussion on how technology could be used to support active learning and engagement, foster social interactions and collaboration, develop students’ higher level cognitive skills (e.g., critical thinking and problem solving), enhance assessment practice, and so on. Provide supporting examples and citations whenever applicable. 

      [Your response can be in text, audio, or video format. Text: 200~300 words. Audio or video:2~ 3 minutes.]
    4. Reasoning: What did you take into consideration when integrating a new technology in teaching? What measures did you take to integrate the new technology with existing teaching and learning resources? What steps did you take to ensure that the new technology supports the learning needs of diverse learners? Provide citations to support your response whenever applicable.

      [Your response can be in text, audio, or video format. Text: 200-300 words. Audio or video: 2-3 minutes.]
    5. Community Engagement: All applications must also include evidence of community engagement within the topic area. Please provide evidence that demonstrate your community engagement within the area of technology integration in dental education. Acceptable evidence includes but are not limited to the following:
      - Actively participate in local, regional, or national professional learning communities (e.g. ADEA Connect).
      - Actively participate in ADEA and/or other professional organizations.
      - Actively participate at conferences, webinars or other professional development events.
      - Actively participate in cross-institutional and cross-disciplinary collaboration.
      - Others (as applicable).

      [You may include written descriptions and/or links as evidence of your participation in these activities.]

    Section 2: Reflection Questions (See Grading Rubric for Evaluation Criteria)

    1. Critical Assessment of Portfolio Work: Provide a self-assessment of your submitted portfolio artifacts. Address the following aspects:
      - What was your primary purpose or goal in creating this work? Who were the learners for this work and what was the intended use or application
      - How was your work informed by current research and practices in technology integration? Provide the supporting references and citations. 
      - How have you been able to (or how will you) assess the effectiveness or impact of this work? Share evidence of effectiveness if available.
      - What are your next steps?

      [Your response must be text based and between 600-800 words.]
    2. Relevant Ethical Considerations: Describe relevant ethical considerations in the area of technology integration and describe how you have addressed (or might address) these ethical challenges. Things you can highlight include but are not limited to particular student populations at risk of being disadvantaged in the technology-enhanced learning (TEL) environment; challenges and risks associated with data collection, maintenance or use; copyright issues; or other ethical consideration such as IRB approval and HIPAA compliance.

      [Your response must be text based and between 200-400 words.]
    3. Supporting Diversity, Equity and Inclusion: In what ways can technology integration in your content area support diversity, equity and inclusion efforts? Provide specific, actionable suggestions or recommendations. You may focus on the application of these efforts towards learners’ learning experience; towards policies or practices that directly support diversity, equity and inclusion efforts; or other relevant applications.

      [Your response must be text based and between 200-400 words.]

    Section 3: Portfolio Artifact (See Grading Rubric for Evaluation Criteria)

    Submission Criteria: Submit at least two portfolio artifacts that demonstrate your knowledge and skill of technology integration in didactic teaching. Examples of portfolio artifacts that you could submit include, but are not limited to, lesson plans, instructional materials, videos, learning activities, lecture recordings, assessment tools (questions, rubrics, etc.), links to technology platforms, students’ work samples or peer-reviewed manuscripts. The two artifacts should be the focus of your previous responses in Sections 1 and 2.